Every profession has its own set of standards that must be adhered to for a variety of reasons. Builders, electricians, and plumbers must follow strict codes to keep people safe. Healthcare professionals must follow HIPPA regulations to maintain your privacy. Just like other professions, graphic designers have their own set of rules they must follow. Amongst those rules, ones relating to the proper use of type are held most dear to the profession. The misuse of these typographic rules may not lead to death like not following electrical codes. However, not following typographic rules will make things much more difficult for someone trying to read the information you have designed.

Since these rules are near and dear to the profession, Art and Creative Directors will spot proper and improper use in your work right away! To prevent you designing unintentionally misleading information and avoid the ire of art and creative directors you will create a poster to demonstrate several fundamental typographic rules found in the second addition of Robin Williams The Mac Is Not a Typewriter.

Using all of the supplied text design an 11×17″ poster in either landscape or portrait orientation. You may only use 100% black type on white paper. You can not use any icons, images, shapes, etc., type only! Finally, you may only use one font family—this means you can use light, regular, italic, bold, etc. within the family—from one of the following available on Typekit: Adobe Garamond, Mrs. Eaves XL, FF Meta, and Skolar Sans.

You can rearrange the content below however you see fit within your layout. Aside from “The Mac is Not a Typewriter” and “by Robin Williams” there is no specific hierarchy to the supplied content. This means that you can also put them in whatever context you wish. If you think quotation and prime marks are the mot important, make them bigger, bolder, higher, etc. If you think widows and orphans are less important, make them smaller in size, lighter in weigth or off to one of the sides of the poster. Untimely the decision is up to you.


The Mac is Not a Typewriter
by Robin Williams

One space between sentences
Use only one space after periods, colons, exclamation point, question marks, quotation marks—any punctuation that separates two sentences.

Quotation and prime marks
Use real quotation marks—never those grotesque generic marks that actually symbolize ditto marks: use “ and ” — not “ and “ when quoting text. Use prime marks to state measurements such as “Bridge Clearance: 16′ 7″ .”

Apostrophes
Use real apostrophes, not prime marks or dumb quotes: ’ not ′ or ‘.

Dashes
Never use two hyphens instead of a dash. Use hyphens, en dashes, and em dashes appropriately.

Hyphen -
A hyphen is strictly for hyphenating words or line breaks.

En dash –
Keyboard Option Hyphen
An en dash is called an en dash because it’s approximately the width of a capital letter N in that particular font and size. It is used between words that indicate a duration, such as time or months or years.

Em dash —
Keyboard Shift Option Hyphen
The em dash is twice as long as the en dash—it’s about the size of a capital letter M in whatever size and typeface you’re using at the moment. This dash is often used in place of a colon or parentheses, or it might indicate an abrupt change in thought, or it’s used in a spot where a period is too strong and a comma is too weak.

Kerning
Adjust the space between letters according to your sensitive visual perception. Kerning is the process of removing small units of space between letters to create visually consistent letterspacing.
WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON

Widows and orphans
Never leave widows and orphans bereft on the page.

When a paragraph ends and leaves fewer than seven characters (not words, characters) on the last line, the last line is called a widow.

When the last line of a paragraph, be it ever so long, won’t fit at the bottom of a column and must end itself at the top of the next column, that is an orphan Avoid both of these situations.

Leading, or linespace
Typically , a standard unit of measure for the leading between the lines is 20 percent of the point size: for example 10 point type will have 12 points of leading.

This has too
much Spacing
This has Better
Linespacing

Paragraph spacing
Adjust the space between paragraphs. Don’t indent first paragraphs.

Never hit two Returns between paragraphs.

Paragraph indents are not five spaces, they are one em.

Don’t indent the first paragraph.

Use extra paragraph space or an indent, but not both.

Hanging the punctuation
Hang punctuation off the aligned edge to eliminate any visual interruption of the text.

“When I get a little money,
I buy books.
If there is any leftover,
I Buy food and clothes.”
Desiderius Erasmus

“When I get a little money,
I buy books.
If there is any leftover,
I Buy food and clothes.”
Desiderius Erasmus

Thou art thy mother’s glass
And she in thee
Calls back the lovely April
of her prime.
William Shakespeare

Thou art thy mother’s glass
And she in thee
Calls back the lovely April
of her prime.
William Shakespeare

Grading

This assignment will be worth 75 points and will be due at the beginning of class as printouts and as a digital file. As an added twist you will need to print out two versions of the poster! Version one will be 11×17″ with Black Text on White. Version two will be 11×17″ White Text on Black. You need to submit your InDesign files via this Dropbox link by the end of the day.